Do you know why 2016 was the worst year in Venezuela? 10 tweets tell you.

12 31
Avatar for ramonoropeza
3 years ago

Today, browsing the internet a bit, I have found a series of testimonies of how 2016 was the worst year for many Venezuelans. They are heartbreaking testimonies and with which I feel very identified. That year I had to stop studying to start working and be able to bring food to my house, that year I spent three days without eating, I was sad to ask for food from my friends and it was the fourth day that I went to university and my Friends asked me if something was wrong and I didn't hold back my tears to tell how hungry I was, and that my family hadn't eaten either. It was truly a horrible year. And I don't wish anyone to go through this. I am forbidden to forget those who have led us to this catastrophe and who must pay for all the evil they have done.

The testimonies arose from a Tweet and there the thread was opened. Here I leave the original and the English version.

Tweet 1. There was a time in 2016 when there was nothing at all, nothing and you had to eat Arepas with freshly ground corn, auyama, yucca, and green plantain, and coffee with "papelón" (because there was no sugar or or was incomparable).

Tweet 2. It was the worst year, I had to get up super early in the morning to help my family to queue at the supermarkets because to buy the order it was for the last number of the ID, risking that when it was my turn, there would be no food. From that moment I learned to eat everything there was and not to leave anything on the plate.

Tweet 3. My most traumatic time for the blackouts was in 2014 and in 2018 we were quite hungry, we began to lose weight, the unfortunate thing is that it is returning with this pandemic. I already lost my appetite from eating so much arepa without a nice filling. I only hope that we manage to survive such misfortune.

Tweet 4. 2016 was a really difficult year, we also went through just having water in the fridge, eating only white pasta (if we could get it), trying to sweeten with glucose. Very hard.

Tweet 5. I don't think I wish anyone the trauma of having to grind a kilo of white corn in order to have just a few arepas that tasted like plasticine for breakfast. (And sometimes only with butter).

Tweet 6. That year my brother committed suicide due to the situation, the hunger I went through, I have already overcome it, the death of my brother I will continue crying forever.

Tweet 7. I remember one night, I had to pretend that I was not hungry so that my younger brother could eat well, I only had a cup of coffee without sugar.

Tweet 8. I had to sell my car, a corsa speed, to be able to buy food. With the 620,000Bs I bought 2 packages of flour, rice and other things and then I was left without a car and without food, damn 2016.

Tweet 9. 2016 was a fateful year. But for many Venezuelan families, things have been getting worse. What is clear is that this 2020 is making it very difficult for all of us, but in Venezuela it is another level.

Tweet 10. I lived it, it was horrible, but it taught me a lot and made me want to get ahead, but despite that I do not wish anyone to pass that experience.

These testimonies mostly belong to young people. We feel that we have lost our youth trying to survive all the challenges that life imposes on us. They are real and crude descriptions with which I feel fully identified and I cannot contain my tears in remembering those days and knowing that there are still many Venezuelans who are having a really bad time. I stay with the last testimony, and give encouragement to all those who are having a bad time during this quarantine: resist, the world, your world is not ending. And as long as there is health and life you can always start again.

If you liked my article. You can contribute by commenting your opinion on this topic, subscribe to my feed. You can also support me to continue bringing quality content with your tip. Contributing to the columnists is of great help to our economy in difficult times. Thank you!

Other articles:

My mother's impossible nightmare

How can Read.Cash Fund impact society?

10 useful tips to survive bad times.

Sponsors of ramonoropeza
empty
empty
empty

6
$ 0.11
$ 0.11 from @Telesfor
Avatar for ramonoropeza
3 years ago

Comments

Please note, it's [sponsors] (lowercase and "s" at the end), not [Sponsor]

$ 0.00
3 years ago

Thank you. Precisely, today I had that doubt with @cain. Thanks for watching.

$ 0.00
3 years ago

Maduro and his group have a lot to be held to account for. I pray and wish the people of Venezuelan a way out and a return to good living. Some developments offer hope for the future. Be great if you could write about those in your next post.

$ 0.00
3 years ago

Thank you for your wishes and prayers. I would like you to be more specific with the developments, what do you mean? Thank you

$ 0.00
3 years ago

This is yet another great article from you, my friend. By taking this novel approach to analyzing what went wrong in Venezuela in 2016, you are giving people insight into how things unfolded from the viewpoint of the citizen, not the political class.

Great work.

How long do you think Maduro can hold his grip on power?

$ 0.00
3 years ago

Thank you for your support, and to say that you like my articles, I appreciate your opinion. Regarding your question, that deserves an article as an answer. I will be publishing it soon.

$ 0.00
3 years ago

I can imagine the self-esteem of venezuelans, after voting socialism and statism into power, and it turned out to be like this.

$ 0.00
3 years ago

Greetings Geri, What you say is a complicated subject to deal with. Venezuela was divided into two, only the Chavistas and the opponents existed. And changing your mind was classified as treason. And now that everything is finished, many Venezuelans are very sad and do not believe in any politician and do not try to talk about politics either. They just want to live their lives in peace away from that super polarized policy that makes us face Venezuelans.

$ 0.00
3 years ago

Interesting. But passivity fuels the regime. There is no way out from the decay, if people dont leave the past behind, and dont reorganize. The passivity is only good for the status quo, then the system will not even have to harrass the opposition, if there is no opposition.

$ 0.00
3 years ago

I agree with you. The people of Venezuela were for a few years fighting hard to get out of the regime. But the hunger and the urgency to get out of the economic crisis on the part of each one of the Venezuelans and also the lack of clarity in the strategy of the opposition leadership made it diminish the spirit of struggle of the Venezuelan people. It is difficult to judge the current "passivity". Because in any case, this passivity is present in the political struggle, but in Venezuela there are protests every day about the horrible services and now, with the pandemic, there have even been looting. Venezuela It is all a case study.

$ 0.00
3 years ago

I have only met a few Venezuelans. They are amazing people who have had to bear a lot of lies, mistrust, and corruption from their Strongman leaders. Their wealth has been pilfered while they are told that this is the "struggle" portion of socialism, when instead, they have just been robbed of their oil.

Keep in mind, Maduro may call himself socialist -- but there has never been a true socialist society in the history of man. Every time a so-called "socialist" or "communist" comes to power, they use the new state ownership process to enrich themselves and their friends instead of using the resources of the people to better the lives of the people. All "socialist" regimes to date have been socialist in name only. Instead, they are corrupt, authoritarian, totalitarian regimes.

I think they have seen what a corrupt socialist society looks like, and hopefully will be able to break free of the dictators once and for all.

$ 0.00
3 years ago