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What unprotected eye can’t see

9 20 exc
Avatar for Besa
Written by   19
2 years ago

Tiny dust particles float invisibly in the air. But then a ray of sunshine comes through the window and suddenly you can see what was invisible. The beam of light exposes the particles to human vision.

Think more about visible light that appears white or colorless to the naked eye. What if sunlight shines through drops of water at the right angle? The water acts as a prism and we see a rainbow of beautiful colors!

In reality, the objects around us reflect different wavelengths of light that our eyes perceive as colors. Green grass, for example, does not produce green light itself, but absorbs all wavelengths of visible light with the exception of green. The grass reflects the green wavelength towards our eyes. So in our eyes the grass looks green.

Supported by artificial instruments

In recent years, many things that are invisible to our eyes without help have become visible through modern inventions. We can look through an ordinary microscope at a seemingly lifeless drop of water and find that it is full of moving creatures of all kinds. And a strand of hair that looks smooth and even to normal eyes will look rough and uneven. Very powerful microscopes can enlarge objects millions of times, which is the size of a postage stamp the size of a small country!

Thanks to the use of even more powerful microscopes, researchers can now obtain contour images of surfaces on an atomic scale. It gives them a glimpse into what was until recently beyond the reach of human vision.

On the other hand, we can look up at the sky at night and see the stars. How many? At first glance, a few thousand at most. But with the invention of the telescope nearly 400 years ago, people began to see a lot more of it. Then, in the 1920s, a powerful telescope at Mount Wilson Observatory revealed that galaxies exist alongside ours, and that they are also full of countless stars. Today scientists estimate that there are tens of billions of galaxies, many of which are made up of hundreds of billions of stars!

It is really surprising that telescopes have shown that billions of stars, resembling the Milky Way in that they appear very close to one another, are separated by incomprehensible distances. Likewise, powerful microscopes helped the naked eye to see that solid-looking objects are actually made up of atoms, which are mostly made up of empty space.

The infinitely small

The smallest point you can see with a standard microscope is made up of more than ten billion atoms! However, in 1897 it was discovered that the atom had tiny particles in orbit called electrons. Over time it was discovered that the nucleus of the atom, around which the electrons rotate, is made up of larger particles: neutrons and protons. The 88 different types of atoms or elements that occur naturally on earth are basically the same size, but differ in weight, as each of these three basic particles has an increasingly larger number.

The electrons (in the case of the hydrogen atom, a single electron) rotate billions of times per millionth of a second in space around the atomic nucleus, whereby the atom is formed and collapsed. act like you are a solid. It would take nearly 1,840 electrons to reach the mass of a proton or neutron. The proton and the neutron are about 100,000 times smaller than the entire atom!

To get an idea of ​​an atom's vacuum level, try to visualize the nucleus of a hydrogen atom in relation to the electron orbiting the atom. If this nucleus, made up of a single proton, were the size of a tennis ball, its orbiting electron would be about 3 km away.

A report on the celebrations for the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the electron said: “Few people think twice before celebrating something that no one has seen, that is imperceptible in size and yet has a measurable weight, electrical charge and Has rotations. like a top. . . . Today nobody questions the idea that there are things we can never see. ""

Even smaller objects

Atom-destroying machines that are able to project particles of matter onto one another now give scientists an insight into the atomic nucleus. As a result, many particles are spelled with strange names: positrons, photons, mesons, quarks, and gluons, to name a few. They are all invisible, even to the most powerful microscopes. But traces of their existence are observed with devices such as cloud and bubble chambers and scintillation counters.

Researchers now see what was previously invisible. In doing so, they understand the meaning of the four basic forces that they believe to be: gravity, electromagnetic force, and two sub-nuclear forces known as the "weak force" and "strong force". Some scientists continue their search for a so-called "theory of everything" which they hope will provide a comprehensive explanation of the universe, from the macroscopic to the microscopic.

What lessons can we learn from seeing what the naked eye cannot? And based on what you've learned, what conclusions have many come to?

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Written by   19
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Comments

Good information you’ve provided

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2 years ago

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2 years ago

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2 years ago

Good post

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2 years ago

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2 years ago

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2 years ago

This is great

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2 years ago

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2 years ago

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2 years ago