NFL: Sport or Theater?

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3 years ago

The NFL possesses an Anti-Trust Exemption to the law granted to it by President John F. Kennedy, which ultimately allows the NFL to classify itself as "entertainment" rather than sport, as well as incorporate itself as a single entity instead of the 32 separate "franchises" they would want you to believe.

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On page 308 of Dan Moldea's book "Interference" he lists over 70 NFL games that have been fixed, Including the names of the 2 referees involved in fixing those games.

He lists interviews with NFL HOF players most notably KC Chiefs QB Len Dawson. He, in detail with documented facts, supported by FBI documents, has interviews with NFL players and known gambling associates to uncover massive game fixing in the league.

Throughout the book, no fewer than 26 NFL team owners have or have had continuous and developing relationships with the gambling world, most notably the Rooney, Bidwill, and Mara families all getting their starts as Bookmakers for established mid-west crime families and buying their NFL franchises with moneys earned from gambling.

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This keeps the regionality of competition in tact without having to compete on a national level. MLB has this status, the NFL does not.

Instead, since the NFL has this Anti-Trust exemption, it is able to package its teams in order to sell to national television companies, which today totals $6 Billion in revenue for the league. That is 75% of the leagues total annual revenue.

In a 2004 lawsuit vs the NFL, the NFL attorney Gregg H. Levy argued that "the NFL is not a collection of 32 individual teams, but rather a single entity. And as long as the NFL teams are a unit, and they compete as a unit in the entertainment marketplace, then they should be deemed a single unit and not subject to any Anti-Trust laws."

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NFL HOFer's Paul Hornung and Alex Karas were suspended from the league for an entire season for gambling and participating in potential game fixing.

 Players are paid to play, not win.

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2007 a Jets season ticket holder sued the NFL for $185 million and the case reached the US Supreme Court.

The Jets fan argued that, all Jets fans are entitled to refunds because they paid for a ticket to a legitimate sporting event.

The NFL argued that the fan simply "purchased a ticket which gives him a contractual right to a seat in a stadium to watch an NFL game between the Patriots and Jets, and this right was honored."

Senior Judge Robert E. Cowen agreed, stating that a ticket to a game only provides you access to the stadium and nothing more.

The fan entered the stadium, witnessed an NFL game, therefore he did not suffer any damages to legally protected right or interest.

The fan's lawyer, Bruce Afran, disagreed arguing that the NFL committed consumer fraud, quote "This seems to suggest that no matter how much ticker holders pay, they can be frauded by NFL teams which puts the NFL on the same level as professional wrestling".

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I am J1, find me on GAB.com, @AcidBrainWash

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